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tchettes French Primer 



OR THE 



Md's first French Lessons 



■tap 



ILLUSTRATE!. >3St>^ ZSBts, 
CJMtd's #ir ^m 



71 



THE ILLUSTEATED GERMAN PRIMER 

Being the easiest Introduction to the Study of German 
for all Beginners. Cloth. Price Is. 



HACHETTE'S 



ILLUSTRATED FRENCH PRIMER 



OB THE 



CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS 



Containing the Alphabet, Words, Phrases, and 
French STursery Rhymes. 



EDITED BY 

HENEI BUfi, B.-es-L., 

FRENCH MASTER AT MERCHANT TAYLORS' SCHOOL, LONDON. 




LIBEAIEIE HACHETTE & C IB - 

LONDON : 18, King William Street, Charing Cross. 
PABIS : 79, Boulevard St. Germain. 

1880. 
[All Bights reserved.] 

SOS . a . left 



3r ■ 2 <5 



I 



TO 



LILIAN HENRIETTE KLEINAU 



THIS LITTLE BOOK 



1$ affectionately inscribed 



BT 



THE EDITOR. 



< 



TO 



LILIAN HENRIETTE KLEINAU 



THIS LITTLE BOOK 



Is affectionately inscribed 



BT 



THE EDITOR. 



Throughout the book the English is given under 
the French ; but it does not necessarily follow that 
the English word is the translation of the French 
word immediately above it. 



INTRODUCTION. 

INTENDED FOB OUR YOUNG READERS' FRIENDS. 



X.— The French Alphabet consists of 26 letters:— 
A, a, a, pronounced like in ah ! bar, far. 



B, 


b, 


&, 


»» 


»i 


butter. 


0, 


e, 


c, 


i> 


ii 


certain or cat.* 


D, 


d, 


<*, 


»> 


ii 


duck. 


B, 


e, 


«, 


»» 


»> 


butter. 


F, 


f, 


/, 


»» 


ii 


fun. 


G, 


g. 


9, 


»t 


91 


girl,\ or like « in pleasure. 


H, 


h, 


h, 


»» 


II 


herb. 


I, 


• 

1, 


m 


» 


If 


bill. 


J, 


• 


h 


»» 


like s in pleasure. 


K, 


k, 


k, 


>» 


ii 


kernel. 


L, 


1, 


I, 


ii 


«i 


learn. 


M, 


m, 


m, 


>i 


♦i 


menace. 


N, 


n, 


», 


>i 


»» 


nerve. 


0, 


o, 


o, 


»» 


like in 


English. 


P, 


P. 


*>, 


»» 


»♦ 


perfect. 


Q, 


q, 


«i 


»i 


ii 


kernel. 


B, 


r, 


r, 


>» 


ii 


receive. 


s, 


S| 


*i 


ti 


ti 


search. 


T, 


t, 


*, 


ii 


»» 


term. 


V, 


n, 


M, 


like the German 
in English ; i 


ii, bnt has no corresponding sound 
something like u in consecutive. 


v, 


▼, 


v, 


pronounced like in veneer. 


w, 


w, 


to 


(=dooble 


v), only 


nsed in words of foreign origin ; is 








sounded like 


v; bnt it keeps the English pro- 








nunciation in 


words borrowed from the English. 


X, 


x, 


», 


pronounced like in exertion, exercise. 


T, 


y» 


y, 


(ee greek) 


like in ./feet. 


z, 


z, 


*. 


like in English. 





* G is soft before e and i, and hard before a, o, u. 
t Is soft before e and i, and hard before a, o, «. 

B 



2 haohxtte's fbbnoh primer; ob 

XX. — Accents and other Slffns. 

There are three accents, placed over the vowels a, 0, i t *, u» 
The vowel y never takes an accent. 

(a.) Accent aigu ('), acute accent, over only. 

(b.) .iccewt grav0 ( % ), grave accent over a, 0, u. 

(c.) Accent circonfiewe ( A ), circumflex accent, over a, 0, 1, o,tt» 

The other marks are: Trtma ("), diaeresis, over 0, i, it, when 
they are to be pronounced distinct from the preceding vowel. 

Apostrophe ('), apostrophe, when a, 0, i, are to be dropped 

before a following vowel. 
Ctdille (c), cedilla, under the e only when it mast be sounded 

as s, before a, o, or u. 
Trait d' union (-), hyphen, which connects two or three wards 

together. 



XXX. — Pronunciation of Vowels. 

1— a href (short) is pronounced like a in cat, chat (pronounce 

shah). 
2— a long (long, with a circumflex accent), or a followed by is 

long, like in arm : time, soul ; bras, arm. 
8— a is silent in aodt, August (pronounce 00) ; toast (like in 

English) ; Satine, river Saone (pronounce sown). 
4 — muet (silent, i.e., without accent), is hardly sounded in a 

word, something like u in butter. 
5—0 muet, is not sounded at all at the end of words oi more 

than one syllable, like in mute, 
6 — is silent in Caen (pronounce Khan). See Nasal Sounds, 32. 
7 — 1 fermi (close, i.e., with an acute accent) sounds like y in 

vanity, vaniti in French. 
8— £ ouvert (open, i.e., with a grave accent), like in where : 

pres, near. 
9 — & (with a circumflex), like ai in the English word air : itre 9 

to be. 
10— i bref, is sounded like % in vanity : id (pronounce like the 

two English letters 0, c), here. 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 8 

U_t long (with a circumflex), like 00 in beet : He (pronounee eel), 
island. 

12—i is silent in oignon (onion), moignon (stump), poignie (hand- 
ful), poignet (wrist), poigne (grip), poignard (dagger). 

13 — bref (without accent), like o in not : noire (our). 

14 — $ long (with a circumflex), or followed by *, like in no, or 
oa in boat : ap$tre (apostle), gros (big). 

15 — is silent in paon (peacock), faon (fawn), Loon (Laon, a town 
in France), and toon (gadfly). 

16— u has no corresponding sound in English ; it sounds some- 
thing like in accurate, consecutive, 

17— 4* is not pronounced after g, except in aiguille (needle), 
aiguiser (to sharpen), aiguillon (goad), aiguUlonner (to 
excite), inextinguible (inextinguishable), and the proper 
name Guise. 

18 — y after a vowel sounds like two i's, pays (pai-is), country ; 
but in all other cases like one i. 

XV. — Diphthongs, and Combination of Vowels. 

19— at, final of verbs, is pronounced like 4 : J'ot, I have. 

-20— ai, followed by a oonsonant, and ait, are pronounced like ai 
in air : /aire, to do, to make. N.B. — ai is sounded like 
unaccented in this verb /aire, when followed by sant, 
sons, sais, sait, sions, siez, saient ; i.e., in the present 
participle, faisant; the first person plural of the present 
Indicative, nous faisons ; and the whole of the imperfect 
Indicative. 

21 — ais and aient, are pronounced like long ai in baiting ; j'avais 
(I had), ils auraient (they would have). 

22— au, eau, avd, out, and owe, are always long, and pronounced 
like in show. 

23 — Em, emn, and en have the sound of a in family, in femme 
(woman), indemnity (indemnity), hennir (to neigh), 
solennel (solemn), and in all the adverbs of manner 
ending in emment. 

24sk-er (final of verbs of the first conjugation), 00, ed, et, and ier, 
are pronounced like e :— porter (to speak), vous-avez (you 
have), pied (foot), premier (first), Soulier (shoe), panier 
(basket), jardinier (gardener), paquet (parcel). 



4 haohette's fbench primes ; ob 

24b-**, not final of verbs, is sounded like are in dare: fier 
(proud), hiver (winter), fer (iron), hier (yesterday), m§r 
(sea), tender (tender of a railway engine). 

25— es, in monosyllables, is sounded like e : des (of tbe), mes, my. 

26— es, in words of more than one syllable, is not sounded: 
tables (tables), tu aimes (thou lovest). 

27 — 0t, and ey, in the middle or at the end of words, are sounded 
like ex in leisure : enseigner (to teach), bey (bey). 

28—elle, effe, esse, enne, erre, ette — the first e is pronounced d, like 
in elbow, chapelle (chapel), greffe (graft), par esse (idleness), 
antienne (anthem), pierre (stone), asnette (plate) ; pro- 
nounce cha-pe-l\ grd-f', pa-re-s', an~ti-i-n\pie-r' t a~ssid-t\ 

29— eu, obu, eux, ceud, and osufs (plural of cevf, egg), like e in her? 
except eu and eus, the past participle, and the past defi- 
nite of the verb avoir (to have), which are pronounced u~ 

80 — Ou, like o in do, or like two English oo's, as in too. 

31— oi, like oa (the sound of the French a being short) : oiseaw 
(bird), pronounce oa-z$. 



V. — Vasal Sounds, 

32— am, em (before b and p), an, aon, and ent, are sounded like en 
in encore. N.8. — Ent is silent in verbs, when it is the 
termination of the third person plwral of a tense. 

33— en, in the body of words, is sounded like an: entendre (to 
hear) ; but like in, at the end of words : examen 
(examination), except in abdomen, amen, etc. (See § 72.) 

34 — im, in, aim, ain, are pronounced something like en in length. 
In, followed by a vowel, either at the beginning or at the 
end of a word, has the same sound as the English pre- 
position in : inutile (useless), coiisine (cousin), (fern.) 

35 — %mm and inn, at the beginning of a word, are always followed 
by a vowel, and sounded as in English : immortel (im- 
mortal), innombrable (innumerable). 

36— om and on, before a consonant, like on in don't. Before a 
vowel the o is pronounced separately, and the m or » is- 
joined to the following vowel, like in English : omelette- 
(o-me-lette), omelet; ontreuu (o-n€-reux), onerous. 



THE CHILD'S FUtST FBENOH LESSONS. 5 

47— 4M», un, followed by a consonant, are Bounded something like 
un in hung (the g being kept silent). When un is before 
a vowel the u makes a syllable, and the n is sounded with 
the following vowel : unanime (u-na-nimo), unanimous. 



VX.— Consonants. 

8. 

38— B is silent in plomb (lead), but is sonnded in radoub (refitting 
of a ship),* club (club), rob (rubber, at whist), and in 
proper names : Joab, Job, Jacob, etc. It is always pro- 
nounced when it is not final : subtil (subtile), abjurer (to 
abjure). 

C. 

89— C is hard before «, o, u, and soft before e, i, and y. With a 
cedilla it is always soft. 

40 — final is generally sounded : bee (beak), aqueduc (aqueduct). 

-41—0 final is not sounded in aecroc (rent or tear), ajonc (furze), 
banc (form or bench), blame (white), broc (jug or can), 
elerc (clerk), eric (screw-jack), croc (hook), tehees (chess), 
escroc (swindler), estomac (stomach), flame (flank or side), 
frame (frank), jonc (rush), lacs (snare, gin), marc (re- 
siduum — e.g.i marc de oaf 6, grounds of coffee), pore (pork), 
raceroc (chance, lucky hit), tabac (tobacco), tronc (trunk 
of a tree). 

42—0 final is sounded in the singular tehee (check) ; and in done 
(then, therefore), when it begins a sentence. In all other 
cases it is not sounded, and done is pronounced don. 

43—0 has the sound of g in second (second) and its derivatives. 

44— Ch is usually sounded as the English sh, but it has the sound 
of £ in almost all words derived from the Greek, as : 
archange (archangel), ehceur (choir), etc; and in the 
word yacht. 

45— Oh is silent in almanack (almanack). 

46— Ot is silent in respect (respect, regard), aspect (aspect, sight, 
look), instinct (instinct), when followed by a consonant ; 

* According to the " Dictionnafre de l'Aoademie Fran<?aise " the 6 is to be 
-sounded in radoub ; but Littre observes that sailors never sound it, even when 
*t is followed by a vowel. 



6 hachettb's french primer; ob 

bat if followed by a vowel the e is sounded like fc ; $.g. r 
aspect agreable, aspek agreable ; respect affect6=r«spefc 
affect! ; instinct imp6rieux=tnsttnfc imperieux. In the 
plural of these substantives ct is always silent : aspects 
agr6ables=osp^5 agreables ; respects affecte , s=re«p& 
affected ; instincts imp6rieux=tnstin-z-imp6rieux. 



47— D final, which is usually silent, is sounded in sud (south), 
iphod (ephod, a part of the Jewish sacerdotal vestment), 
and in proper names : David, Obed, Joad, Cid. 

48 — D final, carried on to the next word, has the same sound as 
the hard T, as : ce grand homme repond a tout (that great 
man replies to everything), read : ce grant homme riponX 
& tout. 

49 — D final in a substantive is not sounded on the following 
adjective, even if it begins with a vowel, as: unfroid 
extrime (a very cold weather), read : un froi extreme ; 
nor on the conjunctions et and ou, as : le froid et le chaud 
(cold and warm weather) ; le chaud ou le froid (warm or 
cold weather), read : le/roi et le chau; le chau et le/rov 



50— F final is sounded like V in net//, dix-neuf y vingt-neuf, etc., if 
the following noun or adjective begins with a vowel or 
h silent : neuf hommes (nine men) is pronounced neuv- 
(h)ommes. If the following noun or adjective begins with 
a consonant the / is silent: neuflivres (nine books) is 
pronounced neu litres, 

51— F final is sounded in canif (penknife), and neuf (nine or new), 
numeral or qualificative adjective, at the end of a sen- 
tence, as: Combien de plumes avez-vous? Pen ai neuf 
(How many pens have you? I have nine). J'ai un 
chapeau neuf (I have a new hat). 

§2— F final is silent in clef (key), chef-d'omvre (master-piece), 
eerf (stag), un cerf -volant (a kite), un osuf frais (a new- 
laid egg), un ceuf dwr (a hard-boiled egg), le bceuf gras 
(the fatted ox), du, bosuf saU (salt beef), des ceufs (soma- 
eggs), des bosuf s (oxen), le* nerfs (the nerves). 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 7 

68— F final is sounded in un chef (a chief), un bosuf (an ox), un 
muf (an egg), un serf (a slave). 



64— G final is usually silent. 

66— G final is silent in the words formed with bourg and berg : 
faubourg (suburb), Strasbourg, Spitsberg, Wurtemberg, etc. 
Also in coing (quince), Hang (pond), rang (rank), sang 
(blood), long (long), poing (fist), hareng (herring), seing 
(signature). 

66-— G final sounds like E before a vowel, as : un ra/ng elevS 
(a high rank), un sang ilhistre' (an illustrious family), are 
pronounced un rank ilevi, un sank illustre ; suer sang 
et eau (to toil and moil), is pronounced suer sank et eau, 

67— G is silent in doigt (finger), legs (legacy), sangsue (leech), 
vingt (twenty), and its derivatives. 

68 — G before e, i, and v has the sound of j in joue (cheek), jour 
(day), as: du gingembre (some ginger). 

69— G is sounded injoug (yoke), grog (grog), and zigzag (zigzag). 

60 — Gn at the beginning of words is pronounced like two different 
letters, as : gnome, pronounced guenfrne. 

61 — Gn in a word is pronounced softly like the g in signing, as : 
agneau (lamb), digne (worthy), r€gner (to reign), nous 
craignons (we fear). But in the word stagnation and 
some few others both the g and n are sounded. In signet 
(book-maker), and in the proper names Clugny, Begnaud, 
and Regnard, the g is silent, and the n keeps its natural 
sound. 



62— H is either silent, as in huitre (oyster), habiter (to dwell), 
hisiter (to hesitate), or aspirate, as in haricot (bean), 
hibou (owl), Mros (hero). But even when said to be 
aspirate, h is not breatned in French as in English— 
that is to say, that to sound the h " aspirate," a simple 
hiatus is sufficient in French, as : les h€ros (the heroes), 
pronounce U-h4ros 9 instead of ItoeWos, as we pronounce 
les homines (the men), lezommes, 

68— In the greater part of French words the h is silent ; but there 



8 



HAGHBTTBB FRBNOH PRIMER ; OK 



are nearly three hundred wordi in which it is aspirate. 
We only give here those which are most in use :— 



Hache, axe. 
Hagard, haggard. 
Hate, hedge. 
HaiUon, rag. 
Haine, hatred. 
Halle, market-place. 
Hcdte, halt. 
Haricot, bean. 
Harangue, speech. 
Harasser, to harass. 
Hardi, bold. 
Hareng, herring. 
Harnacher, to harness. 
Harps, harp. 
Hasard, hazard. 
H8te, haste. 
Haut, high. 
Havre, haven. 
Hennir, to neigh. 
Hiraut, herald. 



H&ri$$er, to bristle up. 
Her%*, hero. 
Hitre, beech-tree. 
Heurier, to strike against. 
Hibou, owl. 
Hideu*, hideous. 
Hisser, to hoist. 
Homard, lobster. 
Honte, shame. 
Hors, oat. 
Houblon, hops. 
Houille, ooai 
Houle, surge. 
Houppe, tuft. 
HouMd, saddle-cloth* 
Houm, holly. 
Hurt, eight. 
Hurler, to howL 
Hutte, hut 



N.8. — If ft is " aspirate * in a word in its simplest 
form, it is also in the derivatives, except in the case of 
htros, in the derivatives of which the h is silent, as 
Vhe'roine (the heroine), VMro'isme (heroism). As for hut*, 
the h becomes silent in dix-huit (eighteen), soixanU 
dix-huit (seventy-eight), quatre-vingt-dix-huit (ninety- 
eight), and vingt-huit (twenty-eight) — pronounce di-euit t 
and vin-tuit ; but h is again " aspirate " in quatre-vingt- 
huit (eighty-eight). 

X» 

64— L liquid is always preceded by an *, either in the body or at 
the end of a word. 

66— In a word, the * is followed by two Ps, the first of which 
is sounded like I, add the second like y, as in bouteUU 
(bottle), pronounce bouteU-ye; abeUle, (bee)=aoetf-ye; 



THE CHILD'S FIBST FRENCH LB8SONS. 9 

bouillir (to boil)=boi*iZ-yir; fills (girl or daughter) =Ai- 
y«; famille (family) =/amtZ-t/«. 

46— At the end of a word the % is only followed by one Z, which, 
however, is liquid, and sounded like the two Z's in the 
middle of the word, as: oil (garlic) = axl-ye; travail 
(vroib)=travail-ye; camail (a short cloak worn by car- 
dinals, etc.) = camail-ye; eventail (fan) = foentail-ye; 
soleil (B\m)=soleil-ye; parett (alike) =paretZ-i/e ; orteU 
(toe)=orteil-ye ; avril (April) =zAvril-ye; babil (prattle) 
= babil-ye ; mil (millet) = miUye ; pSril (peril, danger) 
=pirU~yes orgueil (pride)=orgueil-ye ; fenouil (fennel) = 
fenouil-ye; and most words ending in ail, eil, ueil, and ouii. 

47 — Exceptions : (1) IU is not liquid at the beginning of words, 
as UUgal (unlawful), UUgitime (illegitimate), etc., etc., and 
at the end of some few others, such as mille (a thousand), 
viUe (town). 

48— (2) L is silent in bouril (cask), chenil (kennel), coutil (ticking), 
fils (son), fournil (bake-house), fusil (gun), gentil (pretty), 
gril (gridiron), outil (tool), persil (parsley), pouls (pulse), 
s^dil (drunk), sourcil (eyebrow), and in the plural genttis- 
Jiommes (noblemen). 

•69 — L keeps its usual sound in calms (calm), til (eyelash), exil 
(exile), fit (thread), Nil (Nile), prqfil (profile), subtil (sub- 
tile), mil (thousand, in dates of the Christian era), civil 
(courteous), viX (vile), pupUle (pupil of the eye, or pupil, 
one under the care of a guardian), distiller (to distill), 
vaciller (to waver). 



70— M is silent in automne (autumn), damner (to curse), condemnor 
(to condemn), damnation (damnation), condemnation (con- 
demnation, sentence). 

71 — At the beginning of a word emm is nasal, as emmener (to take 
away), pronounce w-mener ; envmancher (to fit a handle 
to) =2=6n-manoher. 

72— N final is silent, but abdomen, amen, Eden are pronounced 
abdomenn\ omenn', Edenn\ Hymen is pronounced either 
tmenn' or vmain. 



10 haohettb's fbbnoh pbdcmb ; ob 



73— P is mate in bapteme (baptism), baptiser (to baptise, to christen), 
baptist* (baptist), compte (acoonnt), corps (body), dompter 
(to tame, to subdue), exempt (exempt), prompt (quick) r 
sculpter (to sculpture, to carve), sculpteur (sculptor), sculp- 
ture (sculpture), sept (seven), and at the end of words, ex- 
cept cap (cape), and cep (vine-plant). 

74 — P is sounded in septembre (September), septuagSnaire (septua- 
genarian), psaume (psalm), psalmiste (psalmist), psautier 
(psalter), and some few others. 

75— Ph has the sound of f, as philosophic (philosophy), phtisie 
(consumption), etc.; pronounce jUosqfie, ftisie. 

4- 

76 — Q final is sounded in coq (cock) when used by itself, or when 
followed by a vowel, as : un coq (& cook), pronounced like 
in English; un coq-a-Vdne (cock-and-bull-story) = un 
cohaldne; but when the following word begins with a 
consonant the q is not sounded, as coq d'inde (turkey-cock) r 
=c6dinde. Q final is also sounded like a Kin cinq (five), 
unless it is followed by a consonant, as: Combien de 
plumes avez-vous ? Ten ai cinq, (How many pens have 
you ? Five), pronounce ceirik ; but cinq gargons (five boys), 
pronounce cein. However, in the financial expression,. 
cinq pour cent (five per cent.) the q is sounded. 

77 — When Q is not final, it is followed by u. It is generally pro- 
nounced like &, as quand (when) =fcan; quatre (four)= 
hatre; querelle (quarrel) =:herelle; qui (who)=fct (or in 
English leee ; que (whom, or what)=fce or heu; quel (which 
or what) = hel, 

78— But the u is sounded after q in tquestre (equestrian), Equilateral 
(equilateral), Equitation (riding, horsemanship), quintuple 
(five-fold), questeur (questor), questure (ques tor ship). 

79 — Quis pronounced cou in aquatique (aquatic), iquateur (equator), 
equation (equation), quadrupeds (quadruped), quadruple 
(four-fold), in quarto, etc. 

80— B final, which is usually sounded, is silent— 



THE CHILD'S PIEST FRENCH LESSONS. 11 

(a) In the termination— er, as : le boueher (the butcher), 

and in the infinitive of verbs of the first conjuga- 
tion, as : parler (to speak). 

(b) In the termination — lev, as : Vofficier (the officer), 

premier (first), €colier (school-boy). 
81 — But it is sounded in — 

Monosyllables, as : hier (yesterday), mer (sea), ./for (proud) \ 

(but r is not sounded in the verb fier (to trust), which is- 

properly composed of two syllables, and is pronounced/i-d). 
82— Dissyllables, as : amer (bitter), ouster (south wind), cancer 

(cancer), cuiller (spoon), spelt also euiUere, enfer (hell), 

ither (ether), thaler (thaler). 
83 — B final is silent in the words (Monsieur and Messieurs), but is 

sounded in sieur. 
84— Kh has always the sound of JR, as in rhume (cold), rhinoceros 

(rhinoceros). 

S. 
85— S, when placed between two vowels, has the sound of * .* (a) in 

the body of a word, as: reposer (to rest), pronounce 

repozi; and (b) at the end of a word when carried on to 

the next word beginning with a vowel or h silent, as : 

mes amis (my friends), pronounce mS-zamis, 
86— But S has its usual sound in compound words, when the 

simple word begins with 8 as vraisemblable (likely)— 

vraisemblable. 
87— S final, which is generally silent, is sounded in — 

Albinos, albino. Mais, maize. 

Alois, aloes. Mirinos, merino. 

Atlas, atlas. Omnibus, omnibus* 

As, ace. Plus-que-parfait, pluper- 

£ZoctM,investment(ofatown), feet. 

blockade (of a port). Prospectus, prospectus. 

Calus, callosity. Rhinoceros, rhinoceros. 

Iris, iris, rainbow. Tournevis, screw-driver. 

Laps, lapse. Vasistas (pronounce vazis* 

Lis, lily, but silent in fleur* tas), casement window. 
de-Us. Vis, screw; 

and some others not often met with. 
N.B. — In ours (bear) a great many people pronounce the #. 



12 HACHETTB's FRENCH PBIMBB J OB 

88— It is also sounded in words adopted from the Latin, as : W* 
(twice, encore!) chorus, gratis, hiatus, oremus (oremus, 
prayer), sinus (sinus), and in proper names (Latin or 
Greek) such as Bacchus, Crisus, Cyrus, Minos, Fallus, 
Semiramis. [N.B. — S final is not sounded in bis (brown), 
as : du pain bis (brown bread), pronounce bee.] 
The final s is not sounded before a consonant in Denis, Jisns, 
Judas, Mathias, Nicholas, Paris, Thomas. 

89 — S final is sounded like z in obus (shell). 

90 — S final is not sounded on the following vowel in the second 
person singular of the present indicative and subjunctive, 
as : tu aimes a jouer (thou likest to play) ; ilfaut que tu 
ailles a Vicole (thou must go to school) ; pronounce tu 
aimTa jouer ; tu aiUTd Vicole. 

91— So is sounded like s in seine (scene, stage)— sSn* ; sc4n\que 
(scenical) = s^ntfc ; sceptique (sceptic) =s£-ptt ft j science 
(science) =st-ons', and some other words. 

T. 

92 — T at the beginning of words has the same sound as in English, 
even when it is followed by two vowels, as le tiers, the 
third. 

98— T in the middle of words, when followed by the vowel ♦, is 
sometimes pronounced like t, and sometimes like s : 
L Like t : — 

(a) In all words where it is preceded by * or w, as 
, bastion (bastion), bestial (beastly), digestion 

(digestion), mixtion (mixture), guesticw (question). 

(b) In all words ending in tie' or tier, as amitit 

(friendship), moitie' (half), charpentier (car- 
penter), chdtier (to chastise) ; except in the two 
verbs balbutier (to lisp) and initier (to initiate), 
and all its derivatives, where t is pronounced 
like 8. 
(e) In words ending in tie, as partie (part), modestie 
(modesty), etc., except infacitie (facetiousness), 
ineptie (silliness), inertie (sluggishness), minutie 
(trifle), prophitie (prophecy) ; and in words end- 
ing in atie, as dimocratie (democracy), where t 
has the sound of s. 



THE CHILD'S FIBST PRBNOH LESSONS. 18 

(d) In words ending in tien and tienne, as Chretien 

(Christian), mcUntien (maintenance), soutien 
(support), que je tienne (that I may hold), an- 
tienne (anthem) ; except in proper names, as 
DiocUtien (Diocletian), and adjectives denoting 
nationality, as Venitien Yinitienne (Venetian), 
where t is sounded like «. 

(e) In all the persons of verbs ending in turns and 

tie*, as : nous portions, vous partie* (we were, 
yon were starting) ; nous portions (we were carry* 
ing), but the substantive portions (portions) is 
pronounced portions, 
XL Like s :— 

(a) In the word patient (patient), and all its derivatives. 

(b) In words ending in tial, tiel, Hon, as partial 

(partial), confidential (confidential), admiration 
(admiration), nation (nation). 

(c) In some words ending in tie and in all substan- 

tives ending in atie [see above, I. (c)] . 

(d) In the words satiitS (satiety), insatiable (in- 

satiable). 

94— T final is silent, except when followed by another word be- 
ginning with a vowel, as est-elle (is she), tout- a-f ait 
(quite entirely) ; but it is ALWAYS SILENT in the eon- 
junction et, and. 

T final is sounded in the following words : Brut (raw, 
uncultivated), Christ (Christ), chut! (hush !), contact 
(contact), correct (correct), dot (dowry), direct (direct), 
exact (punctual, exact), est (east), fat (fop), granit 
(granite),* incorrect (incorrect), indirect (indirect), in* 
exact (inaccurate), infect (infectious), intact (untouched, 
intact), knout (knout), lest (ballast) ^chec et mat (check- 
mate), net (clear, clean, net), ouest (west), rit or rite 
(rite), strict (strict), toast or toste (toast) ut (or do, the note 
C in music), whist (whist). 

96— In sept (seven) and huit (eight) the t is silent when the fol- 
lowing word begins with a consonant or h aspirate, as : 
sept haches (seven axes), sept francs (seven francs), huit 
couteaux (eight knives) =»4 haches, etc. 

* JJao pronounoed grani(t). 



16 



HAOHSTTIS FRENCH FBDfEB J OB 



Toast (toast), 

AoUt (August), 

Franc (frank), 

Cle/(key), 

Goth (Goth), 

Al-ma-nacfe (almanac), 

Domp-te* (subdued), 

Jois (joy), 

Sang-sue (leech), 

Oi-gnon (onion), 

D6-vous-ment (devotedness) ,, 

II niera (he will deny), 

Sadne (river Saone) 



pronounce Tdrt. 
Ou. 



i» 



»f 



>l 



ft 



>» 



l» 



>» 



»» 



»» 



it 



19 



»» 



Fran. 

016. 

G6. 

Al-ma-na. 

Don-te. 

Jot. 

San-su. 

0-gnon. 

D6-vou-ment, 

Ilnt-ra. 

Sdne. 

Tan. 



Taon (ox-fly) 

The final letters in such words as the following are to be pro- 
nounced only when they are followed by a vowel or h silent : 



Bout (end). 
Es-prit (mind). 
Gens (people). 
Hen-retuB (happy). 
Hon-ten* * (ashamed). 
Longr (long). 
Mais (but). 
Me-res (mothers). 
Mont (mount). 
Pe-res (fathers). 
Pauv (peace). 



(ils) Pen-sent f (they think). 

Pe-tit (small). 

Pint (more). 

Pot (pot). 

Bang (rang). 

Sang (blood). 

Saint (holy). 

Tout (all). 

Tiers (third). 

(tn) Tien* (thou holdest). 

(il) Vient (he comes). 



* And in all the adjectives ending in eux. 
t This applies to all verbs. 



N.B.—'We are indebted to Messrs. Bbette & Masson for the 
above hints on French pronunciation. 



THE CHILD'S FIBST FRENCH LESSONS. 17 



PKEMIEKE PAETIE. 

FIEST PAKT. 



LALPHABET TKE ALPHABET. 

# 

Majuscules.— Capital Letters. 

ABCDEFGHIJ 

KLMNOPQRST 

UVWXTZ 

ABCDEFGHIJK 
LMNOPQRST U 

V W X Y Z 







% f/J^J 



18 hachstte's fbbnch pkimkb ; or 



X.'AX.PHABET.-THS ALPHABET. 



Minuscules.— Small Letters. 



abcdefghijkl 
mnopqrstuvw 

xy z 

abcdefghijkl 
mnopqrstuvw 

x y z 



a 






THE CHILD S FIBST FRENCH LESSONS. 



19 



Sons on Yoyelles Simples.— Simple Sounds. 



A a a 

papa, papa, 

E e e 

cte-mi, half, 

E h, e 

m^-re, mother. 



A A A 
a a 

4-ne, ass. 

E e i 

/-t6, summer. 

A 

EA A 
e £ 

t/-te, Am*/. 



\ \ i \ \ i Y yj/ 

z-ma-ge, image. i-le, island. ly-re, /pr<. 



O o o 

or, gold. 

U u u 

m«-let, mule. 



OA A 
O 

c^-t£, side. 

\J <1 u 

m*J-re, mulberry. 



20 



HAOHETTES TRENCH PRIKKE J OB 



Sons Simples represented par pins d'une Voyelle. 



Simple Sounds represented by more than one Vowel. 



Au 



Chaud Faux 



hot. 



scythe. 



Eau 



Eau 



water. 



A-gneau 

lamb. 



Eu 



Feu 

fire. 



Heu-reux 

happy. 



Ou 



Chou 

cabbage. 



Jou-jou 

plaything. 



THE CHILD'S FIE8T FEKNOH LESSONS. SI 



Diphthongues. — Diphthongs. 



la 



Piano 



Piano 



Ie 



Pied 



Foot 



Io 



Pioche 



Pickaxe 



Oi 



Roi " 



King 



Ui 



Hui-le 



Oil 



Ui 



Suif 



Tallow 



Oui Oui 



Yes 



22 



HACHETTE g FRENCH PRIMER ; OS 



Sons Hasaux. — Nasal Sounds. 



An 



En 



In 



On 



An 


Fan-tome 


year. 


ghost. 


En 


En-fant 


in. 


child. 


Fin 


En-fin 


end. 


at last. 


Bon 


Bon-bon 


good. 


sweetmeat. 



Un 



Un 



one. 



Cha-cun 



each. 



Ain 



Aim 



Pain 


Etain 


bread. 


tin. 


Faim 


Daim 


hunger* 


deer. 



THE CHILD'S FIBST TBJENCH LESiONS. 



SECONDE PARTIE.— SECOND PART. 




Un A-ne. 

Un A-non. 



An Ass. 

A young Ass. 




The Horse. 

The Rider. 



HACHETTl's TBKMOH PRIMES ; OR 




Le Cy-gne. 

Le long Cou. 



The Swan. 

The long Neck. 




Un Pois-son. 

Les Na-geoi-res. 



TBK OKHJ) B FIBST FRENCH LESSOKS. 




The Mouse. 

The Mouse-trap. 



HACHETTB B FRJ4NCH FRIMBI1 ; OB 




Le Boeuf. 




Le Mou-ton. 

La Ber-gi-re. 



The Sheep. 

The Shepherdess. 



[ LESSONS. 27 




Le Lion. 

La Cri-ni-^-re, 



The Lion. 




Le Pont. The Bridge. 

La Ri-vi-6-re. The River. 




''fpM 


JRy 


|% 


Un Nid. 




A Nest. 


Un Oi-seau. 




A Bird. 



ri! FIBST FBENCH LESSONS. 




Le Re-nard. 

La Queue touf-fue. 



The Fox. 

The bushy Tail. 





La Mai-son. 

La por-te et les fe-nS-tres. 



The House. 

The Door and the Windows. 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 31 




L'E-gli-se. 

La Tour. 



The Church. 

The Tower. 




The Book. 

The Page. 



HACHETTE 8 FEKNCH FBIMZB ; OR 




Le Chien. 

La Fi-dtli-ti. 



The Dog. 

Fidelity. 




7 he big Basket. 



THB CHILD'S FIRST FBENCH LESSONS. 88 




Le Coq. 

La Cr£-te. 



The Cock. 




HACHK'rrS S FBKNCH PSDfXS J OB 




Un Ber-ceau. 

Le Bi-bi. 



A Cradle. 

The Baby. 



tee child's fiest French lesions. 85 




La Brou-et-te. The Wheelbarrow. 

Le Mou-lin. The Mill. 



BACHETTSS FRENCH PRIMER | OK 




The Eye. 

The Eyes. 



1 CHILD'S F1BST FRENCH LESSONS. 87 




La Ta-ble. 

Le Pied de la Table. 



The Table. 

The Leg of the Table. 




Un Tambour. 

Le Bruit 



A Drum. 

The Noise. 



hachkttk'b ntxnos- pbimer ; ok 




La Ru-che. 



The Bee-hive. 




Une Pou-pee. 

La Robe et le Cha-peau. 



A Doll. 

The Dress and the Hat, 



THE CHILD S FIRST FBBNCH 




Le Ca-nard. 

LeBec. 



40 bachette'b frenoh fbmeb ; oa 




THE CHILD'S FIBBT FRENCH LEBSONB. 41 




La Frai-se. The Strawberry. 

Les bon-nes Frai-ses. The good Strawberries. 




Un Vais-seau. 

La Mer. 



A Ship. 

The Sea. 



,'a FRXMCH PB1MER ; OB 




La Mai-son de Ma-rie. 

The House of Mary. 

Mary's House. 

Le Toit. The Roof. 

La Che-mi-n^e. Tlie Chimney. 



THE CHILD S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 



48 



La Maison de Marie. 



Mary's House. 



'La por-te. 
,Le pas-sa-gt. 
La cu-i-si-ne. 
. La cham-bre. 
; La cham-bre k cou-cher. 
v L'es-ca-li-er. 
Le sa-lon. 
La sal-le. 

La sal-le k man-ger. 
La nap-pe. 
L'6-tu-de. 
Le pi-a-no. 
Le lit. 
Les ri-deaux. 



The door. 

The passage. 

The kitchen. 

The room. 

The bedroom. 
The staircase. 
The drawing room. 

The hall. 
The dining-hall. 
The cloth. 
The study. 
The piano. 
The bed. 
The curtains. 



44 hachette's fbengh pbimeb ; ob 



Please to tell me the English for: — 

Oreille, grenouille, chasse, 
souris, cornes, pont, nid, eglise, 
chien, berceau, oeil, brouette, 
tambour, canard, ruche, fraise, 
bateau, toit, cuisine, escalier, 
nappe, lit, rideaux. 



I should like to know the French for:— 

Baby, scissors, watch, father, 
cock, rabbit, mill, tree, horse, 
fish, ox, tail, basket, door, 
passage, room, drawing-room, 
study, sword, spoon. 



THE CHILD B MUST FHBNOn LESSONS. 



TEOISIEME PAETIE. 

THIED PAET. 



La cuil-ler de 
bebe. 

Baby's spoon. 



Char-les a un fu-si 

Charles has a gun 

et un sa-bre. 

and a sword. 




HAOHETTB S FBENCH PBHIKB ; OB 




Ce-ci 


est 


une 


This 


is 


an 





reil-le. 

ear. 






Voi-ci le de et 

Here are the thimble and 

les ciseaux. 

the 




Pre-nez ce ver-re. 

Take this glass. 



THE CHILD'S TOUT FRENCH LESSONS. 47 



La mon-tre de 
pa-pa. 

Papa's watch. 




Les gre-nouil-les 

The frog's 

sau-tent. 

jump. 




Le puits est 

The well is 

pro-fond. 

deep. 




hachette's fhknch i'BIMSe; ob 




cer-ceau 

hoop 

rond. 

round. 



est 



pe-re 

father 



a 

has 



Mon 

My 

cor de chas-se. 

hunting-horn. 



THE CHILD S FIRST FRENCH 



L'a-rai-gnee 

The spider 

sa toi-le. 

its webb. 




L'ar-ro-soir pour \ 

The watering pot for 

les fleurs. 

the flowers. 




Voi-la une 

There is a 

feuil-le. 

leaf. 




hachette'b pbrmch phimrb ; ob 




Voi-ci des glands 

Here are some acorns 

tom-bes d'un 

fallen from an 

che-ne. 

oak. 




ha-che pour 



coup-er le che-ne. 

cut down the oak. 




La roue de la 

The wheel of the 

voi-tu-re. 

carriage. 



THE CHILD B FIKSI I 



Queljo-lipe-tit 

What a pretty little 

oi-seau ! 

bird! 



Le coq gron-de la 

The cock scolds the 



pou-le. 

hen. 




La va-che don-ne 

The cow gives 

de bon lait. 

some good milk. 




HAOBETTS'S KtEHCa KBIMEB ; OE 



fiyxij 



Voi-ci des quil-les. 




~. Un en-fant sau-ve 



par un chi-en. 

by a dog. 




Def-i-ez-vous, 

Beware 

pe-ti-tes sou-ris 

little mice 



CHZ CHILDS FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 




Cru-el-le se-pa-ra-ti-on. 

Painful separation. 





La main a qua-tre doigts et 

The hand has four fingers and 

un pou-ce. 

a thumb. 



hachettb's fbench fbimer ; 




Le re-nard est tres ru-se 

The fox is very sly. 




Le cor-beau est tres noir. 

The crow is very black. 



the child's fibbt fbehch lessons. 55 




Le mout-on a un a-gneau. 

The sheep has a lamb. 




Les gar-5ons ont une bal-le. 

The boys have a ball. 



HACHETTE S FBENOH PEISIHE ', OB 




Est-il ar-ri-ve un ac-ci-dent au 

Has an accident happened to the 

cha-ri-ot ? 




/oy-ez le pe-tit chien sur le si-e-ge. 

See the little dog on the box. 



THE CHILD fl KTK3T FRENOH LESSONS. 




Le meu-ni-er et son a-ne 

The miller and his ass 

e-cou-tent le tam-bour. 

listen to the drum, 




Be-be est dans son ber-ceau. 

Baby is in its cradle. 



bachette's French primer; on 




Le pe-re gron-de son fils. 

The father scolds his son. 




lis ren-trent la mois-son. 

They are taking the harvest home. 



THE CHILD S F1B3T FBENCH LESSONS. 




Le pau-vre li-e-vre se-ra-t-il pris ? 

Will the poor hare be taken ? 




Le chas-seur part pour la chas-se. 

The sportsman is going out shooting. 



HACHETTE 3 FBENCH PBIMKB ; OE 




Ce-ci est un mou-lin a eau. 

This is a water mill. 




Un che-val libre et heu-reux. 

A horse free and happy. 




Le ca-pi-tai-ne a ti-re son sa-bre. 

The captain has drawn his sword. 




Un nou-veau re-gi-ment. 

A new regiment. 



haghettb's fbehch rsDren; or 




Le bti-che-ron est fort; 

The woodcutter is strong; 

il a-bat l'ar-bre. 

he cuts down the tree. 




L'e-tang dans la fo-ret. 

The pond in the forest. 



IHB CHILD'S I7BBT FRENCH LK330HS; 




Quel est le plus en-te-te des 

Which is the most obstinate of the 

deux? 




Le chat n'est pas Id! 

The cat is not there ! 



HAOHBTTS 8 F&GNCH PBIMEE ; OB 




_ ----- £ -,-y 



Ces trois ca-nards ai-ment 

These three ducks like 

beau-coup l'eau ; ils ont de 

the water very much ; they have 

l'eau de tous les co-tes. 



THE CHILD'S FIRST TRENCH LESSON B. 




Le cha-teau du sei-gneur est 

The lord's castle is 

en-tou-re d'un fos-se tres 

surrounded by a very 

lar-ge. 



HAOBBTTBB 7BSN0H RUB \ 08 




Le pau-vre pri-son-ni-er est tres 

The poor prisoner is very 

mal-heu-reux dans ce vi-lain 

unhappy in this ugly 



ca-chot. 

dungeon. 




Je vou-drais bi-en de-meu-rer 

I should like to live 

dans cet-te mai-son au bord 

in this house on the bank 

du lac. 

of the lake. 



HACHETTE S FRENCH FBIMER J < 




L'o-ra-ge va bi-en-tot 

The storm is soon going to 

e-cla-ter sur cet-te hau-te 

burst on this high 

mon-ta-gne. 

■ mountain. 



THE CHILD'S FIB3T FRENCH LESSONS. 




A quoi pen-sent ces deux hi-boux? 

What are these two owls thinking of ? 

Je vou-drais le sa-voir ; et vous 

I should like to know ; and you 

aus-si, n'est-ce pas? 

too, would you not ? 




Je ne vou-drais pas ren-con-trer 

I should not like to meet 



ce mon-sieur. 

this gentleman. 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 71 



QlJATRIEME PARTIE. 



Fourth Part. 

)■■■ 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 7$ 



Les Parties du Corps. 

The Parts of the Body. 

La t£te ; le bras, les bras ; 

The head ; the arm, the arms ; 

la jambe, les. jambes ; la main, 

the leg, the , legs; the hand, 

les mains ; le pied, les pieds ; 

the hands ; the foot, the feet ; 

les cheveux ; le front ; l'oeil, 

the hair ; the forehead ; the eye, 

les yeux ; le nez ; la bouche ; 

the eyes ; the nose ; the mouth ; 

le menton; l'oreille, les oreilles. 

the chin ; the ear, the ears. 



THB CHILD'S FIB8T FRKNOH LSS80M8. 75 

Tout le monde aime beb6, 

Everybody loves baby, 

son p&re, sa m&re, son grand- 
its father, its mother, its grand- 

p&re, sa grand'm&re et sa 

father, its grandmother and its 

nourrice. La maman fait 

nurse. The mother 

manger bebe, et tous les 

feeds baby, and all the 

autres le regardent pendant 

others look at it whilst 

qu'il mange. Bebe ne parle 

it is eating. Baby does not speak 

pas encore. 

yet. 



76 haqhetts'b tbixcb pbiheb; ok 




THB CHILD'S FIB8T FRENCH LESSONS. 77 



Voyez ce beau regiment de 

See that fine regiment of 

braves soldats! Le capitaine 

brave soldiers ! The captain 

a un sabre. Les soldats ont 

has a sword. The soldiers have 

des fusils. Louis est tambour; 

guns. Lewis is drummer; 

il a un tambour et des 

he has a drum and some 

baguettes. 

drumsticks. 



HACHETTe'S FRENCH PH1MBB ; OB 




THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 79 



Voici le cottage de la 

Here is the cottage of 

nourrice d' Ernest. II est 

Ernest's nurse. It is 

couvert en chaume. La porte 

covered with thatch. The door 

est entr'ouverte. II y a deux 

is ajar. There are two 

fenetres sur le devant et une 

windows at the front and an 

lucarne. II y a deux marches 

attic window. There are two steps 

devant la porte. 

before the door. 



THE CHILD'S FIBST FRENCH LESSONS. 81 



Voyez ce grand geant; il 

See that great giant ; he 

est en colere ; il a une 

is angry; he has a 

grande massue ; il veut tuer 

great club ; he wishes to kill 

" Jack " ; mais " Jack " est 

Jack ; but Jack is 

brave, il a un bon sabre ; 

brave, he has a good sword ; 

il tuera le geant. Vive 

he will kill the giant Hurrah ! for 

"Jack!" 

Jack. 

o 



HACHET'IE's FRENCH PBIMEB | UB 




THE CHILD'S FIJtST FRENCH LESSONS. 85 



Tom Pouce est tr&s petit. 

Tom Thumb is very small. 

II demeure dans un sabot. 

He lives in a wooden shoe. 

II a ete present e aii roL 

He has been presented to the king. 

Tom Pouce est tr&s brave. 

Tom Thumb is very brave. 

II se bat contre une grosse 

He fights against a large 



araignee. 

spider. 



84 hachktte'b fhencii peimee ; «K 




the cHiLb n ran nas*nm uw*«. 



La vache a avaJe fa patr/re 

The cow ?.*? VWmJ ;/"/*y7 

Tom Pouct ; ;I est si 

Tom Thumb : m \% v, 



petit. Mak Torr, r, *st pas 

small. Itat T-ytt * -*« 







HACTETTE S FBBNCH PMMEK | OB 




THE CHILD'S E£R8T FRENCH LESSONS. 87 



Le facteur apporte des 

The postman brings some 

lettres. II les prend dans 

letters. He takes them from 

sa boite et les donne aux 

his box and gives them to the 

petits enfants qui vont les 

little children who are going to 

porter a leur papa et a leur 

take them to their papa and to their 



maman. 

mamma. 



KACHBTTF S FEESCIt PRI1TVH ; OK ' 




THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 89 



Nous sommes en hiver. II 

We are in winter. There 

y a de la neige et les enfants 

is some snow and the children 

au sortir de Fecole font des 

on going out of school make 

boules de neige et se les 

snow balls and throw them 

jettent. II y a deux gar9ons 

at one another. There are two boys 

sur le mur. 

on the wall. 



90 hachette's fhench 



fiuhek; ob 




THX CHILD'S FIB9T FRENCH UBSSONS. 91 



Georges est tres adroit. II 

George is very clever. He 

a fait ce cerf-volant lui-m&me. 

has made this kite himself. 

Le cerf* volant est plus grand 

The kite is taller 

que Georges. L' artiste a 

than George. The artist has 

peint une maison, un petit 

painted a house, a little 

chien, un homme, la lune et 

dog, a man, the moon, and 

un oiseau. 

a bird. 



92 Bichette's French primer ; or 




THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 98 



Voyez Louise dans sa 

Look at Louisa in her 

chaumiere, elle habille ses 

cottage, she is dressing her 

petits fr&res et ses petites 

little brothers and her little 

soeurs ; elle les peigne et les 

sisters; she combs them and 

d£barbouille ; elle a une 

washes their faces ; she has one 

soeur et quatre freres. 

sister and four brothers. 




J>. wftfc 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 95 



Tiens! qu'y a-t-il? Arthur 

Now then ! what has happened ? Arthur 

est tombe ; il est tombe sur le 

has fallen; he has fallen on the 

tambour; il a creve le tarn- 

drum; he has burst the 

bour et maintenant il est dans 

drum, and now he is inside 

le tambour. Arthur n'est pas 

the drum. Arthur is not 

content, et la personne a qui 

pleased, and the person to whom 

le tambour appartient n'est 

the drum belongs is not 

pas contente non plus. 

pleased either. 



FRENCH PKOCBS; OB 




THE CHILD'S FIBST FRENCH LESSONS. 97 



L'elephant a pris la poupee 

The elephant has taken Edith's doll 

d' Edith avec sa trompe. 

with his trunk. 

J'espere qu'il ne lui fera pas 

I hope that he will not 

de mal. Edith a du chagrin. 

hurt it. Edith is sorry. 

Elle demande sa poupee. 

She asks for her doll. 

L' Elephant n'est pas mediant, 

The elephant is not cruel, 

il lui rendra sa poupee, j'en 

he will give her back her doll, I am 

suis sur. 

sure. 



98 HIOHBTTZ'8 MLENCH PBMKR ; OK 




THE GHILD*S FIB8T FRENCH LESSONS. 99 

Emma a demande & son 

Emma has asked her 

pere de lui faire une balan- 

father to make her a 

9oire dans le jardin. Son 

swing in the garden. Her 

p&re, qui est tr&s habile, lui en 

father, who is very clever, has made 

a fait une. Emma, enchantde, 

her one. Emma, delighted, 

se balance pendant que ses 

swings whilst her 

petites amies se reposent sur 

little friends are resting on 

l'herbe. 

the grass. 



100 hachette's fbench i 




THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 101 



Julie et Rose sont tr&s. 

Julia and Rosa are very 

sages. Elles ont du goftt 

good. They have a taste 

i 

pour la musique. Leur gou- 

for music. Their gover- 1 

vernante est contente d' elles 

ness is pleased with them 

car elles travaillent bien et 

for they work well and 

font des progres. Elles jouent 

make progress. They are playing 

un morceau a deux mains. 

a duet 



102 HIGHBTTX'S TORCH RUHR ', OB 




TBS CHILD'S FIBST FBENOH LESSONS. 108 



Le pauvre Hector s'est cas- 

Poor Hector has broken 

s6 la patte ; son ami Wasp, 

his paw; his friend Wasp, 

qui se trouvait aupr&s de lui, 

who happened to be near him, 

lui a mis la patte en echarpe 

has put his paw in a sling 

et l'a conduit a l'hopital des 

and has taken him to the hospital for 

chiens oti le mddecin en chef 

dogs where the chief doctor 

les a re9us tr&s poliment 

received them very politely. 



104 haghztte's pbknch pkimkb ; ox 




THE CHILD'S 1TB8T FKENCH LESSONS. 105 



Tous les chiens ne sont pas 

All dogs are not 

aussi sages que Wasp; celui- 

as good as Wasp ; this 

ci est un voleur ; il a vote 

one is a thief; he has stolen 

une cane k cette pauvre fille. 

a duck from this poor girl. 

La cane crie tres fort et la 

The duck quacks very loud and the 

fille frappe le chien avec son 

girl is beating the dog with her 

biton. 

stick. 



106 hauhette'b fhznch homer ; ob 




TBS CHILD'S FIBST FSSNOH LESSONS. 107 



Ponto est tr£s obeissant. 

Ponto is very obedient. 

Son maitre lui a dit de faire 

His master has told him 

le beau, et Ponto fait le beau. 

to beg and Ponto begs. 

II lui a dit de fumer sa pipe 

He has told him to smoke his pipe 

et il fume sa pipe; mais je 

and he smokes his pipe ; but I 

crois qu'il n'aime pas beau- 
do not think he enjoys that very 

coup cela. 

much. 



108 HICHKTTB'a FRENCH PRIMES ; OB 



nni& 


:JHR 


|>P 


>^.' 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 109 



Paul et Virginie ont k tra- 

Paul and Virginia have to 

verser un torrent. Virginie a 

cross a torrent. Virginia is 

peur, mais Paul la soutient et 

frightened, but Paul holds her up and 

lui fait traverser le torrent sur 

makes her cross the torrent on 

un tronc cTarbre. Esperons 

the trunk of a tree. Let us hope 

qu'ils traverseront sans acci- 

that they will cross without an acci- 

dent. 
dent. 



B frehch peimkk; ok 




XBB OHILD'8 RB8T FEINCH LBBS0M8. Ill 



Voyez ce joli nid de coli- 

See this pretty humming-bird's nest 

bris. Le colibri est un tres 

The humming-bird is a very 

petit oiseau. II a de tres 

small bird. It has some very 

jolies plumes, un long bee 

pretty feathers, a long, thin 

mince, et il est tres coura- 

beak, and it is very brave. 



geux, 



112 HAOHETTB'S FRENCH FBDOUt J OB 



Maintenant, mes chers 

Now, my dear 



enfant s, je vais vous donner 

children, I shall give you 



quelques enfantines du bon 

some nursery rhymes from the good 



pays de France 

land of France. 



THE CHILD'S FIEST FRENCH LESSONS. 118 



OINQUI^ME PAETIE. 

FIFTH PAET. 



Dd Dd. 

BYE-BYE. 

Do Do. 

Bye-Bye. 

L'enfant do, 

Bye-Bye Baby. 

L'enfant dormira tantot. 

Baby will sleep presently. 

Noel. 

CHRISTMAS. 

Adieu Noel, 

Good-bye Christmas, 

II est pass6 ! 

It is over ! 

Noel s'en va; 

Christmas goes ; 

II reviendra. 

It will return. 
i 



1U b>im'< nzs;s mm: ox 







THE CHILD B FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 

Petit Bonhomme vtt Bneore I 
THE LITTLE MAM 18 ALIVE STILL ! 

1. — Je vous vends mon allumette, 
I sell you my little match, 

Toute vivante, toute vivelette ! 
All alive, all alive I 

2. — Je vous prends votre allumette, 
I take your little match, 

Toute vivante, toute vivelette ! 
All alive, all alive! 



Trop S«rr6. 

TOO TIGHT. 



tMa pantoufle eat trop 6troite ; 
My slipper is too tight; 



Je n'peux pas danser, 
I can't dance, 



Je n'peux pas danser 

I can't dance 

'aree que j'ai trop mal au pied ! 

Because my foot hurts me so ! 



116 hachette's fkenoh primee; or 

Du Feu! 

FERE! 

Chauffons ! Chauffons ! 

Let us warm ourselves ! 

Ma comm&re Jeanneton, 

Mother Janet, 

Prete-moi ton faucillon 

Lend me your bill-hook 

Pour couper une 6pinette 

To cut some wood 

Pour chauffer ma p'tite fillette. 

To warm my little girl. 
N.B.— fipinette means properly hemlock spruce. 



lie Guet. 

THE WATCH. 

Guet ! bon guet ! 

Watch ! good watch ! 

H a frapp6 douze heures ; 

It has struck twelve ; 

Guet ! bon guet ! 

Watch! good watch; 

Dormez dans vos demeures. 

Sleep in your houses. 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 117 

Zia Fin da Conte. 

THE END OF THE TALE. 

J'ai pass6 par la porte Saint-Denis, 

I went under the gate Saint-Denis, 

J'ai march6 sur la queue (Tune souris, 

I stepped on the tail of a mouse, 

La souris a fait cri cri! 

The mouse said queeck, queeck ! 

Et mon p'tit conte est fini. 

And there's an end to my tale. 



Trente, Vlng-t-huit et Trente et Vn. 

THIRTY, TWENTY-EIGHT AND THIRTY-ONE. 

Trente jours ont Novembre, 

Thirty days have November, 

Avril, Juin et Septembre ; 

April, June and September ; 

De vingt-huit il en est un, 

There is a month of twenty eight, 

Les autres en ont trente et un. 

The others have thirty one. 



118 hachette's fbench primes ; or 

Ah! Quel Nez! 

OH! WHAT A NOSE! 

Ah ! quel nez ! 

Oh ! what a nose ! 

Ah ! quel nez ! 

Oh ! what a nose ! 

Ah ! comme il est allong6 ! 

Oh ! how long it has got ! 

Tout le monde en est 6tonn6. 

Everybody is astonished at it. 



Pantin. 

DANCING-JACK. 

Que Pantin serait content, 

How pleased Dancing-Jack would be, 

S'il avait Theur de vous plaire ! 

If he had the luck of pleasing ! 

Que Pantin serait content, 

How pleased Dancing-Jack would be, 

S'il vous plaisait en dansant ! 

If he could please you by dancing ! 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 119 

Ne Prenez pas ma Place! 

DON'T TAKE MY PLACE! 

1. — C'est aujourd'hui la Saint-Hubert, 

It is . to-day Saint-Hubert's day, 

Qui quitte sa place la perd. 

"Who leaves his place loses it. 

2. — C'est aujourd'hui la Saint-Laurent, 

It is to-day Saint-Laurence's day, 

Qui quitte sa place la reprend. 

Who leaves his place takes it back. 

lies Dolg-ts. 

THE FINGEBS. 

1. — Celui-ci a 6t6 k la chasse, 

This little one went a-shooting, 

2. — Celui-ci l'a tu6, 

This little one killed the game, 

3. — Celui-ci l'a plum6, 

This little one plucked it, 

4. — Celui-ci l'a fait cuire 

This little one cooked it 

5. — Et celui-ci l'a tout mang6. 

And this little one ate it all. 

1. Le pouce, the thumb; 2. l'index, the fore-finger; 3. le 
majeur, the middle-finger ; 4. l'annulaire, the ring-finger ; 5. 
raorionlaire, the little finger. 



120 HACHETTE'S FRENCH PKIMEE J OB 

Zia Semaine. 

THE WEEK. 

— Bonjour, Monsieur Lundi. 

Good day to you, Mr. Monday. 

Comment va Monsieur Mardi ? 

How is Mr. Tuesday? 

— Tr&s bien, Monsieur Mercredi. 

Very well, Mr. Wednesday. 

— Je viens de la part de Monsieur Jeudi 

I come from Mr. Thursday 

Dire k Monsieur Vendredi 

To tell Mr. Friday 

Qu'il s'apprete Samedi 

To get ready on Saturday 

Pour aller k T6glise Dimanche. 

To go to church on Sunday. 



Une, Deux, Trois* 

ONE, TWO, THREE. 

Une, deux, trois, 

One, two, three, 

J'irai dans le bois 

I shall go into the wood 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 121 

Quatre, cinq, six, 

Four, five, six, 

Cueillir des cerises, 

To gather some cherries, 

Sept, huit, neuf, 

Seven, eight, nine, 

Dans un panier neuf, 

In a new basket, 

Dix, onze, douze, 

Ten, eleven, twelve, 

Elles seront toutes rouges. 

They will be quite red. 



lies Trots Ponies. 

THE THREE HENS. 

Quand trois poules vont aux champs, 

When three hens go to the fields, 

La premier' march' par devant, 

The first walks in front, 

La second' suit la premiere, 

The second follows the first, 

La troisi&n' march' la derni^re. 

The third comes last. 

Quand trois poules vont aux champs, 

When three hens go to the fields, 

La premier' march' par devant. 

The first walks in front. 



122 hachstte's tbench primer ; or 

Bamasse one Epingle. 

PICK UP A PIN. 

Vois une epingle et ramasse-la, 

See a pin and pick it up, 

Tout le jour bonne chance auras ; 

All the day youll have good luck ; 

Vois une epingle et laisse-la Ik, 

See a pin and let it lay, 

Et tu t'en repentiras. 

Bad luck you*!! have all day. 






* Literally " and you will repent it." 



lie Premier Mot de Xi'Enfent. 

THE CHILD'S FIRST WORD. 

L'aurore vermeille 

The rosy morn 

Eveille 

Awakes 

L'enfant aux beaux yeux 

The child with bright 

Joyeux. 

And pretty eyes. 



THE CHILD'S FIBST FRENCH LESSONS. 123 

Et son doux sourire 

And its sweet smile 

Expire 

Ends 

Dans ce mot charmant : 

In this charming word : 

Maman ! 

Mamma! 

lie Petit Coq qui sort de l'CEuf. 

THE LITTLE COCK COMING OUT OF THE EGG. 

Tic, tac, toe, 

Tick, tack, tock, 

Quel est ce coup sec ? 

What is this sharp knock ? 

Kic, rac, roc, 

Eick, rack, rock, 

C'est <Tun petit bee 

It is a little beak 

Cric, crac, croc, 

Crick, crack, crock, 

La coquille casse; 

The shell cracks ; 



124 HACHETTE'S FRENCH PBIMEB J OB 

Fric, frac, froc, 

Frick, frack, frock, 

C'est l'ergot qui passe, 

It is the spur coming out, 

Clic, clac, cloc, 

Click, clack, clock, 

C'est le petit coq. 

It is the little cock. 

Petit Pied Rose. 

LITTLE ROSY FOOT. 

Petit pied, petit pied rose 

Little foot, little rosy foot 

De mon bien-aim6 qui dort, 

Of my beloved babe who sleeps, 

Toi qui vacilles encor 

You who still totter 

Quand par terre je te pose ; 

When touching the ground ; 

Alors que tu marcheras 

When you can walk 

Petit pied, petit pied rose, 

Little foot, little rosy foot, 

Alors que tu marcheras 

When you can walk 

Qui sait oil tu passeras ! 

Who knows where you will go ! 



THE CHILD'S FIEST FRENCH LESSON^. 125 

Xi'XSnfant <**t*. 

THE SPOILED CHILD. 

Enfant gat6 

Spoiled c child 

Veux-tu du pat6 ? 

Will you have some pie ? 

— Non, ma m&re, il est trop sal6. 

No, mother, it is too salt. 

— Veux-tu du roti ? 

Will you have some roast beef ? 

— Non, ma m&re, il est trop cuit. 

No, mother, it's too much done. 

— Veux-tu de la salade ? 

Will you have some salad 2 

— Non, ma m6re, elle est trop fade. 

No, mother, it is tasteless. 

— Veux-tu du pain ? 

Will you have some bread ? 

— Non, ma m6re, il ne vaut rien. 

No, mother, it isn't good. 

— Enfant gat6, 

Spoiled child, 

Tu ne veux rien manger ; 

You will eat nothing ; 

Enfant g&t6, 

Spoiled child, 

Tu seras fouett6 ! 

You will get a flogging ! 



126 HACHETTE'S FRENCH PRIMER | OR 

lie Mariape de la Blcasse et de la 

THE WEDDING OF THE WOODCOCK AND THE 

Perdrlx. 

PARTBIDGE. 

La b^casse et la perdrix 

The woodcock and the partridge 

Vont se marier lundi ; 

Are going to marry on Monday ; 

Us ont bien de monde assez, 

They have quite enough guests, 

Mais de pain il n'en ont point. 

But they have no bread. 

Par Ik passent deux pigeons 

See yonder come two pigeons 

Dans leur bee tiennent un pain rond ; 

With a round loaf in their beaks ; 

Us ont bien de pain assez, 

Now they have quite enough bread, 

Mais de viande il n'en ont point. 

But they have no meat. 

Par \k passent trois corbeaux 

See yonder come three crows 

Dans leur bee tiennent un gigot ; 

With a leg of mutton in their beaks ; 

Us ont bien de viande assez 

Now they have enough meat 



THE CHILD'S FIBST FBENCH LESSONS. 127 

Mais de vin ils n'en ont point. 

But they have no wine. 

Par Ik passent six souris 

See yonder come six mice 

Sur leur queue tiennent un baril ; 

With a barrel on their tails ; 

Us ont bien de vin assez, 

Now they have quite enough wine, 

Mais de musique n'en ont point. 

But they have no music. 

Par Ik passent trois gros rats 

See yonder come three big rats 

Tenant un violon sous leurs bras ; 

With a fiddle under their arms ; 

— Bonjour, bonjour, la compagnie, 

Good-morning, good-morning all, 

N'y a-t-il pas de chats ici ? 

Are there no cats here ? 

— Entrez, entrez, mes beaux messieurs, 

Come in, come in, my fine sirs, 

Le chat dort au coin du feu. 

The cat's asleep by the fire. 

Le chat s'6tant 6veill6 

But the cat awoke 

Mangea toute la soci6t6 ! 

And ate up all the company I 



128 HACHETTE'S FRENCH PRIMER ; OR 

lie Petit Oiseau. 

THE LITTLE BIED. 

Enfin nous te tenons, 

At last we have got you, 

Petit, petit oiseau ; 

Little, little birdie; 

Enfin nous te tenons 

At last we have got you, 

Et nous te garderons. 

And we will keep you. 

— Dieu m'a fait pour voler, 

God made me to fly, 

Gentils, gentils enfants, 

Dear, dear children, 

Dieu m'a fait pour voler, 

God made me to fly, 

Laissez-moi m'en aller 

Let me fly away. 

— Non, nous te donnerons, 

No, we will give you, 

Petit, petit oiseau, 

Little, little birdie, 

Non, nous te donnerons, 

No, we will give you, 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 12(V* 

Biscuits, sucre, bonbons. 

Biscuits, sugar and sweets. 

— Ce qui doit me nourrir, 

v What is to feed me, 

Gentils, gentils enfants, 

Dear, dear children, 

Ce qui doit me nourrir, 

What is to feed me, 

Aux champs seul peut venir. 

Grows only in the fields. 

— Nous te gardons encor 

We keep for you besides, 

Petit, petit oiseau, 

Little, little birdie, 

Nous te gardons encor 

We keep for you besides 

Une cage en fil d'or. 

A cage with gold wires. 

— La plus belle maison, 

The finest house, 

Gentils, gentils enfants. 

Dear, dear children, 



130 HACHETTK'S FRENCH PRIMER J OB 

La plus belle maison, 

The finest house, 

Pour moi n'est que prison. 

Is but a prison for me. 

— Tu dis la v6rit6, 

You have spoken the truth, 

Petit, petit oiseau, 

Little, little birdie, 

Tu dis la v6rit6, 

You have spoken the truth, 

Eeprends ta liberte. 

Be free again. 



lie B16. 

THE CORN. 

Tica, tica, tac 

Tick, tick, tack 

Dans le moulin 

In the mill 

Le bon grain 

The good corn 

Devient belle farine. 

Becomes fine flour. 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 181 

Tica, tica, tac 

Tick, tick, tack 

Dans le moulin 

In the mill 

La meule 6crase le grain. 

The millstone crushes the corn. 

Gu6, gu6, bons paysans, 

Gay! gay! good peasants, 

Le monde a faim, du courage ! 

The people are hungry, courage ! 

A l'ouvrage ! 

To work! 

Gu6, gu6, bons paysans, 

Gay, gay, good peasants, 

Vivent les bceufs, la charrue et les champs ! 

Hurrah ! for the oxen, the plough and the fields ! 



Ah! tu sortiras Biquette. 

OH! COME OUT NANNY-GOAT. 

Ah ! tn sortiras biquette, biquette, 

Oh ! come out nanny-goat, 

Ah ! tu sortiras de ces choux-lk ! 

Oh ! come out of that cabbage field ! 



132 HAOHETTK'S FRENCH FRIMXB ; OB 

II feut aller chercher le loup ! 

We must go and fetch the wolf i 

Le loup n'veut pas manger biquette, 

The wolf won't eat nanny-goat, 

Biquett' n'veut pas sortir des choux. 

Nanny-goat won't come out of the cabbage field. 

Ah ! tu sortiras biquette, etc. 

Oh ! come out nanny-goat, etc. 

II faut aller chercher le chien ! 

We must go and fetch the dog ! 

Le chien n'veut pas mordre le loup, 

The dog won't bite the wolf, 

Le loup n'veut pas manger biquette, 

The wolf won't eat nanny-goat, 

Biquett' n'veut pas sortir des choux. 

Nanny-goat won't come out of the cabbage field. 

Ah ! tu sortiras, etc., etc. 

Oh! come out, etc., etc. 

H faut aller chercher l'baton ! 

We must go and fetch the stick ! 

L'b&ton n'veut pas battre le chien, 

The stick won't beat the dog, 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 188 

Le chien n'veut pas mordre le loup, 

The dog won't bite the wolf, 

Le loup n'veut pas manger biquette, 

The wolf won't eat nanny-goat, 

Biquett' n'veut pas sortir des choux. 

And nanny-goat won't come out of the cabbage field. 

Ah ! tu sortiras, etc., etc. 

Oh ! come out, etc., etc. 

H faut aller chercher Ffermier ! 

We must go and fetch the farmer ! 

L'fermier veut bien prend' le baton, 

The farmer will take the stick, 

L'baton veut bien battre le chien, 

The stick will beat the dog, 

Le chien veut bien mordre le loup, 

The dog will bite the wolf, 

Le loup veut bien manger biquette, 

The wolf will eat nanny-goat, 

Biquett' veut bien sortir des choux, 

Nanny-goat will come out of the cabbage field. 

Ah ! tu sortiras, etc., etc. 

Oh ! come out, etc., etc. 



13^ HACHETTE'B FRENCH PRIMER ; OB 



Xia Chanson de la Laine, 

THE SONG OF THE WOOL. 

I. 

La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande k etre tondu ; 

Must be sheared ; 

On la tond, on la tond, 

It is sheard, it is sheard, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 

II. 

La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande k etre lavee ; 

Must be washed ; 

On la lave, on la lave, 

It is washed, it is washed, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 185 

III. 

La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande k etre s6ch6e ; 

Must be dried ; 

On la s&che, on la s^cke, 

It is dried, it is dried, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 

IV. 

La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande k etre 6tir6e ; 

Must be stretched ; 

On retire, on retire, 

It is stretched, it is stretched, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 

V. 

La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande k etre cardie ; 

Must be combed ; 

On la carde, on la carde, 

It is combed, it is combed, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 



186 HAOHBTTX'S FBBNCH FBIMEB J OR 

VI. 

La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande k etre fil6e ; 

Must he spun ; 

On la file, on la file, 

It is spun, it is span, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 

VII. 
La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande k etre tordue ; 

Must he twisted ; 

On la tord, on la tord, 

It is twisted, it is twisted, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 

VIII. 
La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande k etre tricotee ; 

Must he knitted ; 

On la tricote, on la tricote, 

It is knitted, it is knitted, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 



THE CHILD S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 187 

IX. 

La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande k etre port6e ; 

Must be worn ; 

On la porte, on la porte, 

It is worn, it is worn, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 

X. 

La laine du mouton 

The wool of the sheep 

Demande h s'user ; 

Must be worn out ; 

On l'use, on Tuse, 

It is worn out, it is worn out, 

La laine du mouton. 

The wool of the sheep. 



lies Wooes du Roitelet. 

THE WREN'S WEDDING. 

Aux noces du roitelet 

At the wren's wedding 

L'6poux est tout petit. 

The bridegroom is very small. 

H part en tourn^e 

He goes his rounds 



186 HACHETTE'S FRENCH PRIMEB ! OB 

Pour faire les invitations. 

To invite his friends. 

Venez avec un petit present chacun 

Come with a little present each of you 

Car Mlas ! il n'est pas riche. 

For alas ! he is not rich. 

J'irai, dit la corneille, 

I shall go, said the crow, 

Et je porterai du pain. 

And I shall bring some bread. 

J'irai aussi, dit la pie, 

I shall go too, said the magpie, 

Et je porterai une pi^ce de viande. 

And I shall bring a piece of meat. 

J'irai aussi, dit le geai, 

I shall go too, said the jackdaw, 

Et je porterai un pot de vin. 

And I shall bring a can of wine. 

J'irai aussi, dit la becasse, 

1 shall go too, said the woodcock, 

Et je ferai le pretre. 

And I shall be the priest. 

J'irai aussi, dit la becassine, 

I shall go too, said the snipe, 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 139 

Pour aider a sonner la cloche. 

To help to ring the bell. 

J'irai aussi, dit le coucou, 

I shall go too, said the cuckoo, 

Avec un tambour sur mon dos. 

With a drum on my back. 

J'irai aussi, dit le milau, 

I shall go too, said the kite, 

Et j 'irai chercher de l'eau. 

And I shall go and fetch the water. 

J'irai aussi, dit le merle, 

I shall go too, said the blackbird, 

Et j'aurai de l'argent dans ma bourse. 

And I shall have money in my purse. 

J'irai aussi, dit le pivert, 

I shall go too, said the woodpecker, 

Et je porterai un faix de bois. 

And I shall bring a load of wood. 

J'irai aussi, dit l'alouette, 

I shall go too, said the lark, 

Et je chanterai au-dessus de la riviere. 

And I shall sing above the river. 

J'irai aussi, dit le chardonneret, 

I shall go too, said the goldfinch, 



140 HAOHETTE'S FRENCH PRIMER ; OR 

Et je chanterai pr6s de la porte. 

And I shall sing near the door. 

J'irai aussi, dit Thirondelle, 

I shall go too, said the swallow, 

Et je chanterai sur le faite. 

And I shall sing on the roof. 

J'irai aussi, dit l'6pervier, 

I shall go too, said the hawk, 

Ensemble avec la tourterelle. 

Together with the dove. 

Moi aussi, dit la m6sange, 

I too, said the tomtit, 

J'irai avec l'^tourneau. 

I shall go with the starling. 

Moi aussi, dit le pinson, 

I too, said the chaffinch, 

J'irai avec la huppe. 

I shall go with the hoopoe. 

Tous les oiseaux s'y trouverent, 

All the birds were there, 

II n'y en eut qu'un seul qui ne vint pas. 

One only did not come. 

Aux noces du roitelet, 

At the wren's wedding, 

L'epoux est tout petit. 

The bridegroom is quite small. 

Note. — Celui qui ne vint pas est l'aigle ; l'aigle est jaloux du 
The one who did not come was the eagle ; the eagle is jealous of 
roitelet. Roitelet en francais veut dire " petit roi." 
the wren. « Roitelet " (wren), in French means " little king." 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FBENCH LESSONS. 141 



Zia Petite Fourml qui allait a Jerusalem. 

THE LITTLE ANT WHO WENT TO JERUSALEM. 

H y avait une fois une petite fourmi qui 

There was once a little ant that 

allait k Jerusalem. 

went to Jerusalem. 

Elle rencontra la neige, et la neige gela 

She met the snow, and the snow froze off 

la patte k la petite fourmi qui allait k 

the paw of the little ant that went to 

Jerusalem. 

Jerusalem. 

neige, que tu es forte, toi qui geles 

Oh ! snow, how strong you are, you who freeze 

la patte k la petite fourmi qui va k J6- 

off the paw of the little ant that goes to Je- 
rusalem, 
rusalem. 

Et la neige repondit: Bien plus fort est 

And the snow answered : Much stronger is 

le soleil qui me fond. 

the sun that melts me. 



142 HACHETTE'S FRENCH PRIMER ; OR 

soleil, que tu es fort, toi qui fonds la 

Oh ! sun, how strong you are, you who melt the 

neige, qui gele la patte k la petite fourmi 

snow, that freezes off the paw of the little ant 

qui va k Jerusalem. 

that goes to Jerusalem. 

Et le soleil r6pondit: Bien plus fort est 

And the sun answered : Much stronger is 

le nuage qui me voile. 

the cloud that hides me. 

nuage, que tu es fort, toi qui voiles le 

Oh ! cloud, how strong you are, you who hide the 

soleil, qui fond la neige, qui g&e la patte 

sun, that melts the snow, that freezes off the paw 

k la petite fourmi qui va k Jerusalem. 

of the little ant that goes to Jerusalem. 

Et le nuage r6pondit: Bien plus fort est 

And the cloud answered : Much stronger is 

le vent qui me chasse. 

the wind that drives me away. 

vent, que tu es fort, toi qui chasses le 

Oh ! wind, how strong you are, you who drive away the 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 148 

nuage, qui voile le soleil, qui fond la neige, 

cloud that hides the sun, that melts the snow, 

qui g&e la patte a la petite fourmi qui va 

that freezes off the paw of the little ant that goes 

k Jerusalem. 

to Jerusalem. 

Et le vent r6pondit: Bien plus forte est 

And the wind answered : Much stronger is 

la montagne qui m'arrete. 

the mountain that stops me. 

montagne, que tu es forte, toi qui arretes 

Oh ! mountain, how strong you are, you who stop 

le vent, qui chasse le nuage, qui voile le 

the wind, that drives away the cloud, that hides the 

soleil, qui fond la neige, qui g&le la patte 

sun, that melts the snow, that freezes off the paw 

h la petite fourmi qui va k Jerusalem. 

of the little ant that goes to Jerusalem. 

Et la montagne r^pondit : Bien plus forte 

And the mountain answered : Much stronger 

est la souris qui me perce. 

is the mouse that pierces me. 



144 hachette's fbench primer ; or 

souris, que tu es forte, toi qui perces 

Oh ! mouse, how strong you are, you who pierce 

la montagne, qui arrete le vent, qui chasse 

the mountain, that stops the wind, that drives away 

le nuage, qui voile le soleil, qui fond la 

the cloud, that hides the sun, that melts the 

neige, qui g&le la patte a la petite fourmi 

snow, that freezes off the paw of the little ant 

qui va k Jerusalem. 

that goes to Jerusalem. 

Et la souris r^pondit : Bien plus fort 

And the mouse answered: Much stronger 

est le chat qui me mange. 

is the cat that eats me. 

chat, que tu es fort, toi qui manges la 

Oh ! cat, how strong you are, you who eat the 

souris, qui perce la montagne, qui arr6te 

mouse, that pierces the mountain, that stops 

le vent, qui chasse le nuage, qui voile le 

the wind, that drives away the cloud, that hides the 

soleil, qui fond la neige, qui g&le la patte 

sun, that melts the snow, that freezes off the paw 

k la petite fourmi qui va k Jerusalem. 

of the little ant that goes to Jerusalem. 



THE CHILD'S FIBST FRENCH LESSONS. 145 

Et le chat r6pondit : Bien plus fort est le 

And the cat answered : Much stronger is the 

chien qui m'effraie. 

dog that frightens me. 

chien, que tu es fort, toi qui efiraie le 

Oh ! dog, how strong you are, you who frighten the 

chat, qui mange la souris, qui perce la 

cat, that eats the mouse, that pierces the 

montagne, qui arrete le vent, qui chasse 

mountain, that stops the wind, that drives away 

le nuage, qui voile le soleil, qui fond la 

the cloud, that hides the sun, that melts the 

neige, qui g61e la patte k la petite fourmi 

snow, that freezes off the paw of the little ant 

qui va k Jerusalem. 

that goes to Jerusalem. 

Et le chien r&pondit : Bien plus fort est 

And the dog answered : Much stronger is 

le baton qui me frappe. 

the stick that strikes me. 

baton, que tu es fort, toi qui frappes 

Oh 1 stick, how strong you are, you who strike 

L 



146 HACHETTE'S FRENCH PRIMER J OB 

le chien, qui effraie le chat, qui mange la 

the dog, that frightens the cat, that eats the 

souris, qui perce la montagne, qui arrete 

mouse, that pierces the mountain, that stops 

le vent, qui chasse le nuage, qui voile le 

the wind, that drives away the cloud, that hides the 

soleil, qui fond la neige, qui g61e la patte 

sun, that melts the snow, that freezes off the paw 

k la petite fourmi qui va k Jerusalem. 

of the little ant that goes to Jerusalem. 

Et le baton repondit: Bien plus fort est 

And the stick answered : Much stronger is 

le feu qui me brule. 

the fire that hums me. 

feu, que tu es fort, toi qui brules le 

Oh ! fire, how strong you are, you who hum the 

baton, qui frappe le chien qui effraie le 

stick, that strikes the dog, that frightens the 

chat, qui mange la souris, qui perce la 

cat, that eats the mouse, that pierces the 

montagne, qui arrete le vent, qui chasse 

mountain, that stops the wind, that drives away 



THE CHILD'S FIBST FEENCH LESSONS. 147 

le nuage, qui voile le soleil, qui fond la 

the cloud, that hides the sun, that melts the 

neige, qui g61e la patte a la petite fourmi 

snow, that freezes off the paw of the little ant 

qui va k Jerusalem. 

that goes to Jerusalem. 

Et le feu repondit: Bien plus forte est 

And the fire answered : Much stronger is 

l'eau qui m'eteint. 

the water that quenches me. 

eau, que tu es forte, toi qui 6teins 

Oh ! water, how strong you are, you who quench 

lfe feu, qui brule le baton, qui frappe le 

the fire, that burns the stick, that strikes the 

chien, qui effraie le chat, qui mange la 

dog, that frightens the cat, that eats the 

souris, qui perce la montagne, qui arrete 

mouse, that pierces the mountain, that stops 

le vent, qui chasse le nuage, qui voile le 

the wind, that drives away the cloud, that hides the 

soleil, qui fond la neige, qui g61e la patte 

sun, that melts the snow, that freezes off the paw 

k la petite fourmi, qui va k Jerusalem. 

of the little ant, that goes to Jerusalem. 



148 HACHETTE'S FRENCH PRIMES ', OS 

Et l'eau repondit : Bien plus forte est 

And the water answered: Much stronger is 

la vache qui me boit. 

the cow that drinks me. 

vache, que tu es forte, toi qui bois 

Oh ! cow, how strong you are, you who drink 

Feau, qui 6teint le feu, qui brflle le baton, 

the water, that quenches the fire, that hums the stick, 

qui frappe le chien, qui effraie le chat, qui 

that strikes the dog, that frightens the cat, that 

mange la souris, qui perce la montagne, 

eats the mouse, that pierces the mountain, 

qui arrete le vent, qui chasse le nuage, 

that stops the wind, that drives away the cloud, 

qui voile le soleil, qui fond la neige, qui 

that hides the sun, that melts the snow, that 

gele la patte k la petite fourmi qui va k 

freezes off the paw of the little ant that goes to 

Jerusalem. 

Jerusalem. 

Et la vache repondit: Bien plus fort est 

And the cow answered : Much stronger is 

Thomme qui me tue. 

the man that kills me. 



THE CHILD'S FIKST FRENCH LESSONS. 149 

homme, que tu es fort, toi qui tues la 

Oh ! man, how strong you are, you who kill the 

vache, qui boit l'eau, qui 6teint le feu, 

cow, that drinks the water, that quenches the fire, 

qui brtile le baton, qui frappe le chien, qui 

that burns the stick, that strikes the dog, that 

effraie le chat, qui mange la souris, 

frightens the cat, that eats the mouse, 

qui perce la montagne, qui arrete le vent, 

that pierces the mountain, that stops the wind, 

qui chasse le nuage, qui voile le soleil, qui 

that drives away the cloud, that hides the sun, that 

fond la neige, qui g61e la patte k la petite 

melts the snow, that freezes off the paw of the little 

fourmi qui va k Jerusalem. 

ant that goes to Jerusalem. 

Et rhomme r^pondit : Bien plus fort est 

And the man answered : Much stronger still is 

encore Dieu qui a cre6 rhomme, qui tue 

God who created the man, that kills 

la vache, qui boit l'eau, qui 6teint le feu, 

the cow, that drinks the water, that quenches the fire, 



150 hachette's fbench primer ; or 

qui brule le baton, qui frappe le chien, qui 

that burns the stick, that strikes the dog, that 

eflraie le chat, qui mange la souris, 

frightens the cat, that eats the mouse, 

qui perce la montagne, qui arrete le vent, qui 

that pierces the mountain, that stops the wind, that 

chasse le nuage, qui voile le soleil, qui fond 

drives away the cloud, that hides the sun, that melts 

la neige, qui gele la patte a la petite fourmi 

the snow, that freezes off the paw of the little ant 

qui va k Jerusalem. 

that goes to Jerusalem. 



Exercices de Prononciation. 

EXERCISES ON PRONUNCIATION. 

Chat vit rot, 

Pussy saw the roast beef, 

Rot tenta chat ; 

The roast beef tempted pussy; 

Chat mit patte k rot, 

Pussy put her paw to the roast beef, 



THE CHILD'S FIRST FRENCH LESSONS. 161 

Rot briile patte k chat. 

The roast beef burnt pussy's paw. 



Biz tenta rat ; 

The rice tempted the rat ; 

Rat tent6 tata riz. 

The tempted rat ate the rice. 



Ton the t'a-t-il 6t6 ta toux ? 

Has your tea taken away your cough ? 



Didon dina, dit-on, du dos d'un dodu dindon. 

Dido dined, they say, off a fat turkey's back. 



Combien ces six saucissons-ci ? 

How much are these six sausages ? 

-Six sous ces six saucissons-ci. 

These six sausages are six sous. 

-Six sous ces six saucissons-ci ! 

Six sous these six sausages ! 

Ces six saucissons-ci sont si Chens ! 

These six sausages are so dear ! 



Voici six chasseurs sachant chasser. 

Here are six huntsmen who can hunt. 



Quatre plats plats dans quatre plats creux, 

Four flat dishes in four hollow dishes, 

Quatre plats creux dans quatre plats plats. 

Four hollow dishes in four flat dishes. 



152 HACHETTE'S FRENCH PRIMES ; OB 

Celui-lk n'est pas ivre 

He is not tipsy 

Qui trois fois peut dire : 

Who three times can say : 

Blanc, blond, bois 

White, fair, wood 

Blond, bois, blanc i barbe grise, bois. 

Fair, wood, white) grey beard, wood. 

Bois, blond, blanc 

Wood, fair, white / 



Devinettes. 

RIDDLES. 

Je Tai vu vif, je Tai vu mort, 

I saw it alive, I saw it dead, 

Je l'ai revu vif apr^s sa mort. 

I saw it alive again after its death. 

Une bougie allum6e, e*teinte, puis rallumSe de nouveau. 
A lighted candle, extinguished, and then lighted again. 

Six pieds, quatre oreilles, 

Six feet, four ears, 

Deux bouches, deux fronts, 

Two mouths, two foreheads, 

Quelle bete est-ce done ? 

What animal is that then ? 

Un cheval et son cavalier. 
A horse audits rider. 



THE CHILD'S ITBST FRENCH LESSONS. 158 

Petite robe blanche 

Little white dress 

Sans couture ni manche. 

Without seam nor sleeve. 

Un ceuf . 

An egg. 

Dis-moi, de grace, quelle est la chose 

Tell me, pray, what thing it is 

Qui nuit ni jour ne se repose ? 

That rests neither day nor night ? 

La riviere. 
The river. 

Madame Grand-Manteau 

Mrs. Great-Cloak 

Couvre tout, excepts l'eau. 

Covers all things but water. 

La neige. 
The snow. 

Qui me nomme me rompt. 

He who names me breaks me. 

Le silence. 
Silence. 



Lendtn : J. S. Levin, Steam Printer, 9, Mark Lane Square, B.C. 



THE FIRST FRENCH BOOK. 

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1 Vol. 176 Pages. Cloth, price lOd. New Edition, Revised. 

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the first year will prove of the most valuable assistance 

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Adopted by the School Board for London, etc. 

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